Daily Question – 100

Two sets of pronouncements. In the olden days of the Internet, on certain channels of communication, what would be used to bookend such statements?

Set 1:

Whatever happens, the U.S. Navy is not going to be caught napping.
Frank Knox, U.S. Secretary of the Navy, on December 4, 1941.

With over 50 foreign cars already on sale here, the Japanese auto industry isn’t likely to carve out a big slice of the U.S. market.
Business Week, 1958.

We have a saying in Iran: “The dogs bark but the caravan continues.” People can bark and it will not bother us. Why should it?
The Shah of Iran, in 1979.

Set 2:

I get to go to a lot of famous places, like Canada.
Britney Spears, on the good parts of being famous.

If you stay here much longer, you’ll all be slitty-eyed.
Prince Philip, husband of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth, to British students in China during a 1986 state visit.

I stand by all the misstatements that I’ve made.
Dan Quayle

Answer: This is the abbreviation “QFI”, as used on IRC. Expands to “quoted for irony” or “quoted for idiocy” depending on the context.

Went uncracked.

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5 responses to “Daily Question – 100

  1. I say “emoticon” – smileys.
    Or maybe on a completely wrong track !!

  2. LOL
    ROTFLOL
    :)

    All were popula “bookends” of classic statements like these.

  3. gaffe

  4. CONGRATS ON A WELL-CRAFTED CENTURY!

  5. Nice answer for the 100th! :-)